Datingsite for intelligent people

In August, the press pounced on The League while it was in development, labeling it "Tinder for elitists," (Huff Po) and painting its target customer as "a narcissist with an over-inflated evaluation of their own worth" (The Daily Dot).

Aptly named to imply a superior caste of digital daters, The League relies on a screening algorithm that promises to keep its community "well-balanced and high-quality," so perhaps the negative press was somewhat understandable.

As a Heavy Hitter paying a month (standard use of The League is free), no one can see your profile unless you want them to.#2: The curation thing. Think about it: There are single people who are only on Hinge to look at the pictures, not to do anything, and married people messaging away on Tinder just for the thrill of flirting.

Unlike most dating apps, you can't just join The League and immediately start pawing through the platform—which is, of course, what the press lunged at earlier this fall. Bradford doesn't want those game-players and ghost-like profiles cluttering her app, so she says that if users "aren't logging in, not responding to users, or people are messaging them and they're not messaging back, little things like that," they'll take action.

But then again, it benefits all women, not just the no-bullshit Olivia Popes and multitasking Gwyneth Paltrows of the world.

It's great—really great—in spite of what some people might have you think.

And if you're frustrated with your love life, you just might try to compensate by working harder and achieving even more to fill that void.

With these nuanced yet necessary tweaks to the traditional dating app model, The League cuts through so much of the riffraff that makes dating apps good in theory but not always great in practice.

So while the media was quick to dismiss Bradford in August—"Do you really need a Stanford MBA to launch a dating app?

In fact, the smarter you are, the more clueless you will be, and the more problems you're going to have in your dating life. Smart people spent more time on achievements than on relationships when growing up. And smart families are usually achievement-oriented. The upshot of all that achievement is that you get into a top college -- congratulations!

Once upon a day I used to be pretty smart, and believe me, I had a lock on clueless. -- and then continue doing even more of what you were doing before.

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